Dr Ranginui Walker

  1. The reduction of the Māori to a position of one of many minorities negates their status as the people of the land and enables the government to neutralise their claims for justice more effectively than it does now. (Auckland University 1995)
  2. During my years as a teacher trainee and a university student, I realised that Ōpōtiki was a microcosm of of power relations of Pākehā domination and Māori subordination in the rest of New Zealand. P.10. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  3. I equipped myself with a PhD, so that my view of reality would be accorded the same respect that was given to Pākehā commentators and ‘experts’ who made pronouncements and wrote authoritative books, dissertations, and reports on Māori failings. P.11. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  4. None of the Māori activists i knew had read Marx, Gramsci or Friere. But because of domination and subordination they were the most successful practitioners of the academy’s emancipatory theories that it was my privilege to know. P.12. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  5. The onus is now on Māori, both committed and ‘born again’, to stand up and be politically counted. P.89. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  6. Many Māori have an aversion to putting an eminent person down by the anonymous power of the ballot box. P.90. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  7. Annette Sykes : theoretically could have opted for a peaceful life and risen to even dizzier heights. But as a Māori, it is not an option. Her genes have aligned her to the struggle and not the Establishment. P.95. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  8. Māori are in it for the long haul, and sooner or later the Crown has to come to terms with it. P.95. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  9. The fiction fostered by the purveyors of the Treaty was the ideology of the Crown as a benevolent, all-powerful monarch guaranteeing Māori rights. The ideology masked the reality of the power being vested in Parliament, which was not bound by the Treaty. P.111. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  10. History is littered with broken treaties, and the Treaty is no exception. P.112. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  11. Ariki like the British royals, have to be above the rough and tumble of politics. P.119. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  12. One of the problems bedeviling the Government in dealing with Māori is the clamor of voices wanting to be heard. P.120. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  13. Māori are masters of theatre, and the marae is the stage where orators strut thier stuff in the cut and thrust of debate. P.122. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  14. The cultural divide for to long has been denied by prevailing Pākehā ideology of one people. Māori have tried to counter that ideology with their own one biculturalisim, meaning two people in one nation. P.125. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  15. There is today no Māori justice system extant in its own right, and Pākehā reap the consequences in Māori offending. P.131. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  16. The structural relationship between the Māori as tangata whenua and the Pākehā who settled the country in the last 150 years is one of social, political, and economic tyranny of majority rule. P.142. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  17. The coloniser knows all too well the potential of violence for social transformation, for it was through violence that a tribal society was destroyed and the nation state of New Zealand brought into being. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  18. Māori people have felt the pain of dispossession under the treaty for 150 years. But before even one acre or one cent of compensation was returned to the Māori by the Waitangi Tribunal, the views of the Pākehā crying foul were given prominence in newspapers. P.142. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  19. Māori Males were not born warriors. They were trained to it, just as soldiers are trained. They were also gardeners, artists, hunters, fishermen, and house builders. P.158. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  20. Knowledge is a form of power, which the ruling class control and monopolise. P.161. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  21. Theoretically, education is the avenue for upward mobility for intelligent members of lower strata.  But, in reality, education operates a gate-keeping system of certification and credentialing, which keeps the structural relations of inequality in place. P.161. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  22. Because the first nations are ethnically distinct from the invaders, they are invariably relegated to the lowest strata of the new nation state. P.161. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  23. Long before Ngata moved to empower his own people, the intellectual elite of the ruling class foresaw the danger of Māori intellectuals competing with Pākehā for status and resources. P.162. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  24. Because Māori occupy the moral high ground for our past, it is uncomfortable for Pākehā to confront our colonial past. P.184. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  25. With the advance of colonisation, the balance between kāwanatanga and tino rangatiratanga was overridden by the settler government. Ngā pepa a Ranginui Walker. 1996
  26. Since the coming of the Pakeha to New Zealand in the nineteenth century, millions of words have been written about Maori people by Pakeha authors in books, magazines and newspapers. The result has been a variegated mishmash of romanticism, myth-making, fact and fiction with liberal lashings of stereotyping, denigration and distortion of history. Nga Tau Tohetoho Years of Anger.  pg 11.
  27. Captain Cooks rediscovery in 1769 of a country that was never lost served as a a validating charter for a British claim to a country that was already owned. Nga Tau Tohetoho Years of Anger.  pg 11.
  28. My political consciousness and radical perspective grew slowly from a series of accumulated experiences. Nga Tau Tohetoho Years of Anger.  pg 12
  29. I struggled hard to believe the church mythology Nga Tau Tohetoho Years of Anger. pg 17
  30. As I grew up and became educated I became aware that there was a need to correct Pakeha perceptions of reality.  Nga Tau Tohetoho Years of Anger. pg 17
  31. I made up my mind that a B.A was possible, then an M.A., then a PhD., because once you get the qualifications you ought to be more potent person for the Maori cause. Nga Tau Tohetoho Years of Anger.  pg 17
  32. The argument that there are reputed to be fewer than two hundred full-blooded Maoris in New Zealand today is a favorite ploy of some Pakehas to deny Maori people a separate identity. Nga Tau Tohetoho Years of Anger.   pg 213
  33. The differences of our colonial past are being settled in the bedrooms of the Nation. Metro 2001. Referring to intermarriage.