Graham Hingangaroa Smith CNZM

  1. If your life has been too smooth and uneventful then you may be too accepting of the status quo. In this regards struggle is important and formative. It makes you think about what you’re for, as well as what you are against. People often just see what they are against, as opposed to being able to understand what is what it is they are struggling for and to change. Once we understand our struggle from both of these perspectives it can be genuinely transferring.  (2015). Kātene, Selwyn. Fire that Kindles Hearts. Steele Roberts Publishers.
  2. The point is that all Māori academics need to be working for change. (2015). Kātene, Selwyn. Fire that Kindles Hearts. Steele Roberts Publishers.
  3. Māori leadership must enable the social, cultural, economic and political well being of Māori. (2015). Kātene, Selwyn. Fire that Kindles Hearts. Steele Roberts Publishers.
  4. Goof Māori leadership is responsive to the needs of our communities and iwi at large. (2015). Kātene, Selwyn. Fire that Kindles Hearts. Steele Roberts Publishers.
  5. Privatised academic: my criticism is that too many Māori and Indigenous academics are self-serving, engaged simply for their own personal outcomes. Being a Māori academic is more than just a whakapapa claim. (2015). Kātene, Selwyn. Fire that Kindles Hearts. Steele Roberts Publishers.
  6. Māori academics need to position themselves alongside thier iwi and communities. They have to guard against the seduction of elitism. An academic credential does not automatically confer leadership status.  (2015). Kātene, Selwyn. Fire that Kindles Hearts. Steele Roberts Publishers.