Paparangi Reid

  1. Like a boil-up of brisket, spuds and cabbage, its not really Māori kai, although it is food that becomes a reality for many Māori. With all the focus on our identity, perhaps we we confuse what makes a real Māori with what are common Māori realities. (1995) Toi Wahine The Worlds of Māori Women. Penguin Books.
  2. Among ourselves we call each other ‘plastic Māori, ‘potato’, ‘born again Māori’ or a ‘real Māori’. Well, I don’t know what about anyone else, but I need to know – who is a ‘real Māori’? Is it someone who speaks Māori as their first language? Is it someone brought up around the marae, or the Māori bureaucrat employed by the kāwanatanga? Maybe it’s characters in Alan Duff’s book, Once Were Warriors. How does a blue-eyed blond from Ngāti Whatever get on in Māori identity stakes? Is it, as they say in multi choice exam questions, all of the above? (1995) Toi Wahine The Worlds of Māori Women. Penguin Books.
  3. Perhaps we should look at all the Māori realities adn take the best from our quest for that mythcal beast, the real Māori. Be yourself, you’re real aren’t you? I am. (1995) Toi Wahine The Worlds of Māori Women. Penguin Books.