Sir Sidney Moko Mead

Hirini Moko MeadSir Sidney (Hirini) Moko Haerewa Mead

  1. The chief, that grand figure from our romantic past,  who is capable of exercising influence and power upon the community, has become almost extinct. Instead, the land is full of pretending chiefs of little or no influence, bent on personal aggreandiesment. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  2. A sad fact of life is that the foundations of Maoritanga are slipping away before our eyes. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  3. We are so hungry for praise and so scared of displeasing the Pakeha that we appear to be little too willing to turn a blind eye to what is happening to our own people or to our culture. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  4. We have been rather too eager to take a hand in our own destruction as an ethnic group, and too ready when political pressure is applied to denounce our own people. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  5. It is worth pointing out, however, that many of our present leaders are not at all like Maui and would prefer more of the same. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  6. It is perhaps ironic that Maori is more enmeshed in the Pakeha world than the other way around – the Pakeha can get by without us but we have become a dependent child unable to contemplate a future without the Pakeha. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  7. We have been Pakeha watching for so long, and so busy defending our culture in one crisis after another, that we no longer know how to grasp the initiative. (This in relation to developing our culture). Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  8. Born a Maori die a Maori. Why spend a lifetime trying to be something you are not. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  9. I personally cannot accept as democratic a system which allows a candidate chosen by Pakeha voters to minister the needs of the Maori people and do the job badly. Such a person is not answerable to the Maori vote and cannot therefore be a man of the people. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  10. No Iwi should deliberately spoil the chances of another iwi to achieve a measure of self-determination. There has been a history of pulling one another down, and this practice of ‘crab-antics’ must stop. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  11. Ask not what your iwi can do for you, but consider what you can do for your people. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  12. In drawing our people to the tribal center, we must also find ways of removing any feelings of threat that the people at home might experience. They kept the home fires going, they protected our ahi-ka while we enjoyed careers, full employment and opportunities in the outside world. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  13. Why did so many people cry on Bastion Point day? Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  14. We need to take a good look at Maori organisations with a view towards making them more effective and cohesive. P.97, Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  15. An action taken supposedly to uphold the law must have been if it made many of our people cry. P.98 Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  16. I believe it is essential to provide the Maori with a different sort of equality – namely, access to the mass media, or equality of expression. P.99 Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  17. The land wars were a lesson to the Maori of Pakeha power and their need to be superior, and to be dominant in the sense of exercising total control over everything and every Maori body. Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  18. One of the problems we face is how to create such a demand and an interest in Maoritanga that the defections to the European roll will cease and our people will come back again. P.131, Landmarks, Bridges and Visions. Sidney Mead. 1997
  19. Whakapapa provides our identity within a tribal structure and later in life gives an individual the right to say ‘I am Maori’. (Tikanga Maori: Living Maori Values. P 42)