Tā Tipene O’Regan

Tipene O'Regan

  1. Lawyers could be the new muskets. In reference to settling raruraru without tikanga (2016).
  2. Myth is the only reality.
  3. There is no point having lots of light if you don’t have a dark to put it in.
  4. The notion at stake is the Treaty right to development, something Māori fought hard for and is now being overridden.
  5. Until we are our own owners, we are denying the rangatira that our tūpuna placed upon us to protect or recover. (2001) O’Regan Hana. Ko Tahu Ko Au. Horomaka Publishing.
  6. We have to strengthen the confidence of the flax-roots people. If they are strong, the people are strong. If the cooks are happy the marae is happy. (2001) O’Regan Hana. Ko Tahu Ko Au. Horomaka Publishing.
  7. If you were to ask me about the nature of leadership, in terms of what I’ve learnt, I’d say you’ve got to have a fire in your belly for an outcome. (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  8. One of the important things about rangatiratanga is the freedom to go broke. (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  9. After a time, it gets a bit demanding, not just in physical terms, but also mentally – you have to be tough. (in relation to Māori leaders) (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  10.  I once described myself as Ngāi Tahu’s Lampton Quay ‘rent a mouth’. (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  11. I think I am now at the point where I have to rest a bit. (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  12. To some extent, your career is what you make of it. (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  13. Any process of leadership is a process, to some extent, of teaching, trying to get the issues into a simple form that people can comprehend. (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  14. Opportunities come and when they’re gone, they’re gone – very seldom do they reappear. (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  15. I don’t see a huge amount of highlights in my life. (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  16. I have to say Ngai Tahu have, at last, got their heads out of the swamp, but we’re still standing in the swamp. In relation to a comment that “Ngai Tahu have been causing problems ever since they stuck their heads out of the swamp to see if Te Rauparaha has gone. (2003) Diamond Paul. A Fire in your belly. Māori Leaders Speak.
  17. The most important leadership quality is to be able to dream. (Wānanga at Rehua Marae 2017 for Master of Māori and Indigenous Leadership, Canterbury University).
  18. Most politicians and bureaucrats know what they are opposed to, but not what they are in favor of. (Wānanga at Rehua Marae 2017 for Master of Māori and Indigenous Leadership, Canterbury University).
  19. My job was easy, as for 7 generations Ngai Tahu  have stated what they wanted. In reference to leading Ngai Tahu and its claims and in reference to other Ngāi Tahu leaders. (Wānanga at Rehua Marae 2017 for Master of Māori and Indigenous Leadership, Canterbury University).
  20. All marae divide three ways. Two competing whānau and one neutral whānau to moderate. (Wānanga at Rehua Marae 2017 for Master of Māori and Indigenous Leadership, Canterbury University).
  21. Kaiapoi was our Singapore. (Wānanga at Rehua Marae 2017 for Master of Māori and Indigenous Leadership, Canterbury University).
  22. Leadership is a product of circumstance. (Wānanga at Rehua Marae 2017 for Master of Māori and Indigenous Leadership, Canterbury University).
  23. All sorts of people are made important in retrospect. (Wānanga at Rehua Marae 2017 for Master of Māori and Indigenous Leadership, Canterbury University).
  24. A leader is someone who can evolve a dream and can share that dream with others. (Wānanga at Rehua Marae 2017 for Master of Māori and Indigenous Leadership, Canterbury University).
  25. We are the shareholder that never dies (Takituu 2017)
  26. Do we just want to be rich Pakeha with a suntan or is our purpose the inter generational transmission of identity and heritage. (Takituu 2017)
  27. Typically a family business lasts three years. Indigenous businesses need to plan at least 7 generations in advance.  (Takituu 2017)
  28. You have to understand New Zealand history to understand Maori history. (Takituu 2017)
  29. Iwi can not become Iwi welfare providers. The government have an Article II responsibility for that. (Takituu 2017)
  30. There is no point leaving your resources in a university library or archive. You must share it. This allows us as a people to be more knowledgeable. (Takituu 2017)
  31. Google doesn’t tell the truth about me. (Takituu 2017)
  32. To name is to claim. (In reference to proving ownership rights to land).
  33. I was always taught never to begin a speech with an apology. A Ngāi Tahu perspective on some Treaty questions 1995
  34. The claims settlement process morphed into a culture (in relation to some people could not identify as being Ngāi Tahu without a claim grievance). (2017)
  35. You are either an Iwi nation or you are not. If you are not: you may as well pack up everything including reo and culture. (2017)
  36. If we haven’t got a sustained marae, we are not Māori. (2017)
  37. We know in fine detail what we don’t want and what we don’t want to be! We are far less clear on what we do want, about what and how we want to be. (The Economics of Indigenous Survival and the Development of Culturally Relevant Governance)
  38. In many ways New Zealanders have a far clearer view of what they don’t want or are opposed to rather than what they do want and are actively in favor of. (Māori and Parliament: Diverse Strategies and Compromises. Maria Bargh 2010).
  39. I am Ngāi Tahu, which makes me Māori. (Māori and Parliament: Diverse Strategies and Compromises. Maria Bargh 2010).