New ICT Media in NZ

Often i express my concerns of the myopic/lazy ICT journalists in NZ (to be fair i know it is not all journalists). From my experience they will often just print a media release and call it journalism or even worse, blatantly ignore large issues within the ICT sector that have impacts on businesses and society within NZ.

One story that was published in the NZ Herald, Stuff, TVNZ etc was about a couple who claimed that Google awarded the two a contract to translate Google into Maori. One of the couple on a Maori language program on TVNZ then claimed that the translated version would search web pages in written in Maori. A quick look in the Google Account would have reveled that Google offer the public an option to sign up in a non hierarchal group to translate Google into their own language, Maori is one of the copious options. The couple made the claim after 75% of Google was translated. The translator did not know anything about the couple and vice versa. The lack of a 5 minute job to sign in to Google and have a look created a waterfall effect of an untruthful story. In the end i made a complaint to Google.

Recently i spoke with a respected NZ ICT journalist (re above story) who agreed with my thoughts. I was also furnished with disturbing insights into the large media company that person worked at.

Today i read in Aardvark that finally someone has done something about the myopic journalism in NZ. According to Bruce Simpson of Aardvark “The Royal Society of NZ won a contract to establish and operate this media centre”.

As has been pointed out, will this give rise to the quality of media articles and information from the current media outlets, or will this rich source of information become a threat that is ignored ?. At the time of writing non of the mainstream media have written about the media centre nor can i find any information in Google News.

I am now curious as to whether we will see a new publication either electronically or in paper catering to the current gap in ICT/Science related matters.

I anticipate that we will all look forward to being better informed with our own ICT media in the near future.
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2 responses to “New ICT Media in NZ”

  1. Potaua Biasiny-Tule says:

    Kia ora e te whanaunga – just thought you'd appreciate the press release from today's Google Maori Launch. You can also see coverage of it on TVOne at: http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/536641/1935790

    PRESS RELEASE – For Immediate Release
    TangataWhenua.com
    23 July 2008

    "Google in Maori launches to global audience"

    To celebrate Te Wiki o te Reo Maori 2008, a group of dedicated volunteers has worked together to translate the Google homepage and search interface into the Maori language. Today, it is our honour to launch this valuable online language resource to the Maori community, and to the world.

    "The Google in Maori project has been a labour of love and reflects the passion we have to providing digital platforms for Maori communities. We also wanted to encourage Maori to consider work within the IT sector, especially rangatahi (young people)" said Potaua Biasiny-Tule, Managing Director of TangataWhenua.com, who helped to spear-head the current stage of the project.

    "Our goal was to bring together a committed team of language practitioners and leading Maori IT specialists to create a Maori language tool that could be used freely and that would be relevant to the digital world."

    The team volunteered to translate the homepage as part of the Google in Your Language programme, an initiative started by Google in 2001 that allows anyone to sign up as a volunteer to translate Google products into languages they currently are not available in. The programme has been a success because it helps pull from the knowledge and wisdom of many, and allows people to help create web tools in their own languages.

    "At Google, our broader mission is to organise the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful," Ashley Gorringe, Marketing Manager for Google in Australia and New Zealand said. "An important part of realising this mission is working to make sure that people have access to information no matter where they are in the world, or what language they speak."

    "The translation of the Google homepage into Maori represents the culmination of a tremendous effort on the part of the Maori language volunteers, and has provided a wonderful new way for Maori speakers the world over to connect with information and the global community online."

    The call for Maori translators to work on the project began in 2001 when Craig Neville Manning, Google's Head of Engineering in New York, began coordinating with Dr. Te Taka Keegan. By 2006 over 68% of the translations had been completed, and the New Zealand Maori Internet Society put out the call for more volunteers. In June 2007, Potaua and Nikolasa Biasiny-Tule begin facilitating the translations and contacted Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Maori seeking their assistance. Wiha Te Raki Hawea Stevens then began work translating the full list of messages, and in April 2008 Dr Te Taka Keegan and Wareko Te Angina began the final work of verifying the translations and checking them for consistency.

    During this time more than 1,600 terms and phrases, totalling 8,500 words, have been translated, allowing for the Google homepage, search interface and search preferences to be viewed in te reo Maori.

    "When we started, there was a collective desire to see Maori listed amongst the more than one hundred language options for the Google homepage and today, we have achieved that" said Mr Biasiny-Tule.

    "It has been no easy feat, but with the support of Te Taura Whiri i te reo Maori (Maori Language Commission) and leaders like Wiha Te Raki Hawea Stevens, Ara Tai Rakena, Wareko Te Angina and Dr Te Taka Keegan, this project is of the highest possible standard and is now ready for launch."

    The announcement was made at a launch event at Te Wananga o Aotearoa's Taiwere Campus in Rotorua. Speakers at the launch included Huhana Rokx, chief executive of Te Taura Whiri i te reo Maori, Ashley Gorringe, Marketing Manager for Google in Australia and New Zealand, Dr Te Taka Keegan from Waikato University and Hawea Vercoe, principal of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Rotoiti.

    This stage of the Google Maori project was co-ordinated by husband and wife team Potaua & Nikolasa Biasiny-Tule, who have been active in developing online Maori communications since 2002.

    "It is imperative to find resources that resonate with the next generation of language users. The key is to find innovative ways to attract them, thereby ensuring language sustainability," stated Mrs. Biasiny-Tule.

    "Our hope is that Google in Maori is a profound step in the journey towards the long term survival of te reo Maori."

    Screenshots of the Google in Maori page and interface are available here: http://picasaweb.google.com/press.centre.australianz/GoogleInMaori?authkey=ydwV69eqbvY
    For more information on Te Wiki o te Reo Maori 2008 please visit this website: http://www.korero.maori.nz
    For more information on the Google in Your Language program and Google's language initiatives, please visit this blog post: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2008/07/hitting-40-languages.html
    For more information please contact:

    Potaua Biasiny-Tule: Executive Director – TangataWhenua.com
    +64 7 345 8139
    +64 21 250 3521
    potaua@tangatawhenua.com
    http://www.tangatawhenua.com

    David Griswold: Google Inc.
    +61 2 9374 4329
    press-australia-nz@google.com

  2. Potaua Biasiny-Tule says:

    Kia ora e te whanaunga – just thought you'd appreciate the press release from today's Google Maori Launch. You can also see coverage of it on TVOne at: http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/536641/1935790

    PRESS RELEASE – For Immediate Release
    TangataWhenua.com
    23 July 2008

    "Google in Maori launches to global audience"

    To celebrate Te Wiki o te Reo Maori 2008, a group of dedicated volunteers has worked together to translate the Google homepage and search interface into the Maori language. Today, it is our honour to launch this valuable online language resource to the Maori community, and to the world.

    "The Google in Maori project has been a labour of love and reflects the passion we have to providing digital platforms for Maori communities. We also wanted to encourage Maori to consider work within the IT sector, especially rangatahi (young people)" said Potaua Biasiny-Tule, Managing Director of TangataWhenua.com, who helped to spear-head the current stage of the project.

    "Our goal was to bring together a committed team of language practitioners and leading Maori IT specialists to create a Maori language tool that could be used freely and that would be relevant to the digital world."

    The team volunteered to translate the homepage as part of the Google in Your Language programme, an initiative started by Google in 2001 that allows anyone to sign up as a volunteer to translate Google products into languages they currently are not available in. The programme has been a success because it helps pull from the knowledge and wisdom of many, and allows people to help create web tools in their own languages.

    "At Google, our broader mission is to organise the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful," Ashley Gorringe, Marketing Manager for Google in Australia and New Zealand said. "An important part of realising this mission is working to make sure that people have access to information no matter where they are in the world, or what language they speak."

    "The translation of the Google homepage into Maori represents the culmination of a tremendous effort on the part of the Maori language volunteers, and has provided a wonderful new way for Maori speakers the world over to connect with information and the global community online."

    The call for Maori translators to work on the project began in 2001 when Craig Neville Manning, Google's Head of Engineering in New York, began coordinating with Dr. Te Taka Keegan. By 2006 over 68% of the translations had been completed, and the New Zealand Maori Internet Society put out the call for more volunteers. In June 2007, Potaua and Nikolasa Biasiny-Tule begin facilitating the translations and contacted Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Maori seeking their assistance. Wiha Te Raki Hawea Stevens then began work translating the full list of messages, and in April 2008 Dr Te Taka Keegan and Wareko Te Angina began the final work of verifying the translations and checking them for consistency.

    During this time more than 1,600 terms and phrases, totalling 8,500 words, have been translated, allowing for the Google homepage, search interface and search preferences to be viewed in te reo Maori.

    "When we started, there was a collective desire to see Maori listed amongst the more than one hundred language options for the Google homepage and today, we have achieved that" said Mr Biasiny-Tule.

    "It has been no easy feat, but with the support of Te Taura Whiri i te reo Maori (Maori Language Commission) and leaders like Wiha Te Raki Hawea Stevens, Ara Tai Rakena, Wareko Te Angina and Dr Te Taka Keegan, this project is of the highest possible standard and is now ready for launch."

    The announcement was made at a launch event at Te Wananga o Aotearoa's Taiwere Campus in Rotorua. Speakers at the launch included Huhana Rokx, chief executive of Te Taura Whiri i te reo Maori, Ashley Gorringe, Marketing Manager for Google in Australia and New Zealand, Dr Te Taka Keegan from Waikato University and Hawea Vercoe, principal of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Rotoiti.

    This stage of the Google Maori project was co-ordinated by husband and wife team Potaua & Nikolasa Biasiny-Tule, who have been active in developing online Maori communications since 2002.

    "It is imperative to find resources that resonate with the next generation of language users. The key is to find innovative ways to attract them, thereby ensuring language sustainability," stated Mrs. Biasiny-Tule.

    "Our hope is that Google in Maori is a profound step in the journey towards the long term survival of te reo Maori."

    Screenshots of the Google in Maori page and interface are available here: http://picasaweb.google.com/press.centre.australianz/GoogleInMaori?authkey=ydwV69eqbvY
    For more information on Te Wiki o te Reo Maori 2008 please visit this website: http://www.korero.maori.nz
    For more information on the Google in Your Language program and Google's language initiatives, please visit this blog post: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2008/07/hitting-40-languages.html
    For more information please contact:

    Potaua Biasiny-Tule: Executive Director – TangataWhenua.com
    +64 7 345 8139
    +64 21 250 3521
    potaua@tangatawhenua.com
    http://www.tangatawhenua.com

    David Griswold: Google Inc.
    +61 2 9374 4329
    press-australia-nz@google.com

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