Aotearoa Māori Internet Organisaiton AMIO

amio

Name: Aotearoa Maori Internet Organisation
Also Known As: AMIO
Entity Type: Online
Affiliations: New Zealand Maori Internet Society, The New Zealand Maori Internet Society.
Industry Sector: Internet
Web site: http://www.amio.org.nz
Date Established: 2003
Date disestablished: 2009
Membership Model: Online bulletin board membership

Contents

AMIO was created by several former executive members and kaumatua of The New Zealand Maori Internet Society: Ross Himona, Karaitiana Taiuru, Te Rangilaiwhiria Kemra, Teanau Tuiono and Bernadette Murray.

Their purpose was to fill the gap of what they believed to be a lack of Maori representation in the Internet and ICT arena. This occured at a time of political unrest within the Maori Internet community and their representatives.

AMIO was an online bulletin board web site that had a number of groups catering to the wide and ever expanding ICT landscape. Tutorials and support networks were developed on this site.

AMIO believed there was an urgent need for Maori to begin defining what the Internet is to Maori, how are and will Maori be affected, and Maori culture and identity impacted by this. To foresee and predict its long term impact on Maori society and identity.

That the migration and increased participation of Maori onto the internet and world wide web need not be limited to being mere participants only in the current structure and facilities available. Rather, it believed that the internet and World Wide Web can be fashioned and shaped to better encapsulate our culture and discourses.

AMIO recognised that Maori have a long history of resistance to the commodification of their culture and knowledge and recognised that current intellectual property laws are completely inadequate at protecting Maori culture from commercial exploitation.

AMIO believed that modes of communication and dissemination of information are inadequate to encompass and promote future dynamic growth of Maori culture, values and discourse, online.It also recognised that the majority of Maori are participators only in the internet and that in order for the internet and World Wide Web to become more supportive of Maori culture and identity, then there is a dire need for Maori internet developers who can become authors and creators of web functions and web structures more conducive to Maori modus operandi.

AMIO believed Maori had to move on from just web design and email list management to web programming, application development, communications enhancements to better suit Maori styles and values of communications.

Some achievemnts of AMIO included:

  1. Made the only submission on behalf of Maori re the 2ld survey to protect .iwi.nz and .maori.nz
  2. Sent a representative to a community conference to speak about Maori IP rights and at least one delegate to the “World Summit on the Information Society “Global Forum of Indigenous People and the Information Society” in Geneva
  3. Sent a delegate to the Communities Online conference in Wellington to discuss “Lessons learnt on the Internet for Maori organisations and IP rights.
  4. Approached for a second time a cyber squatter who has taken many Iwi and other sensitive Maori names

Objectives of the Aotearoa Maori Internet Organisation included:

  1. to promote and define a strong Maori presence and entity on the internet.
  2. The Aotearoa Maori Internet Organisation (AMIO) will participate and seek relationships with many national and International IT bodies and actively participate in:
    (a) Government submission processes on legislation
    (b) Represent Maori on government consultation processes
    (c) International discussions and forums that can/do impact Maori.
    (d) National submissions, surveys that concern the .nz Internet space
  3. to work directly with Maori Internet community including individuals, Iwi and Hapü and will support any non Maori organisation that wishes to advance Maori in Information Technology.
  4. to promote internet service creators vs/over services users and participants.

 

Key people

  • Ross Himona (Kaumatua)
  • Te Rangikaiwhiria Kemara
  • Karaitiana Taiuru
  • Bernadette Murrary
  • Teanau Tuiono

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