What is the strategy of the music industry?

Over the past few months there have been a number of media releases about the music industry ?

http://www.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idUSTRE49C4BH20081013?feedType=RSS&feedName=technologyNews&pageNumber=1&virtualBrandChannel=0

I find it hard to believe that a music band refuses to put their music on iTunes as they want to halt the sales of single music and promote album sales. One reason why iTunes and downloaded mp3s are so popular is because you do not have to purchase a whole album. If you don’t give the mass of your customers what they want they will  react in different manners.

As consumers we have a right to choose what we want to purchase. Forcing an album sale will only create a larger issue of piracy as someone will copy the CD and make it available to assist others so they don’t have to make a purchase as well.

The obvious ripple effect is those fans of AC/DC who own an iPod or MP3 player will utilise pirated MP3 files so they can listen to their music in the manner they want and paid for.

 A few weeks ago Apple threatened the music industry with the fact that it would close down iTunes if the music industry wanted to increase royalties. Again i say, why increase prices when it is cheaper to produce music and mp3 files than ever before. The music industry is always mentioning that the sales of CDs are continually dropping each year so why not adapt the business model to concentrate more on download sales.

Today i note that Amazon is now selling online music without any DRM attached further removing the supposed monopoly for the online music industry.

 Moreover in more madness the New Zealand Copyright Act Amendment Section 92a will allow the music industry to only suspect that you are downloading illegal music whether it is an anonymous tip off or a malicious tip off or a justified complaint to your ISP, your ISP will be legally bound to cut your Internet connection pending an investigation.

Colin Jackson on Radio New Zealand made some disturbing comments that the Music industry  literally at the last minute made a submission that the govt accepted without the chance for anyone to comment on. It all sounds rather calculated and dubious to me.

 Then we read this survey http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/-/2/hi/technology/7664088.stm

 It appears as though the main desire of the music consumers is to have a choice what they do with the music they purchase and that the music should be cheaper as it is cheaper to produce.

 

Copying music or movies is not really like stealing a car as the anti piracy propaganda suggests. Bill Thompson from BBC Digital planet also agrees with me on this. Bill Thompson commented that copying music is not like stealing a car because if you steal a car it is removed from the owner and physically gone, if you copy music it is still there and the owner keeps their original product.

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2 responses to “What is the strategy of the music industry?”

  1. brenda says:

    You’re right it’s not like stealing a car, it’s like borrowing it with out permission, and topping up the petrol tank when you’re done. And if you like the car, goibg back to buy it, And then telling your friends about this new model car you test drove so they go buy one.

    As for s92a … There is no requirement of an investigation. It’s up to your ISP if they want to trawl through logs, if they even have them, and if they can’t find proof there’s the possibility you were using simple encryption. Isps are not going to want to pay for this investigation ( and why should they pay the cost of policing the music industry’s business model) The reality of this new law is, if you’re accused you are immediately punished as guilty and that’s the end. There is no forum to prove your innocence or even meet your accusers.

  2. brenda says:

    You’re right it’s not like stealing a car, it’s like borrowing it with out permission, and topping up the petrol tank when you’re done. And if you like the car, goibg back to buy it, And then telling your friends about this new model car you test drove so they go buy one.

    As for s92a … There is no requirement of an investigation. It’s up to your ISP if they want to trawl through logs, if they even have them, and if they can’t find proof there’s the possibility you were using simple encryption. Isps are not going to want to pay for this investigation ( and why should they pay the cost of policing the music industry’s business model) The reality of this new law is, if you’re accused you are immediately punished as guilty and that’s the end. There is no forum to prove your innocence or even meet your accusers.

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